Stem Cell Conditions

Hip – The hip joint is a ball and socket lined with cartilage in the ball (the femoral head) and the socket (acetabulum). The cartilage can be damaged or degraded by conditions such as arthritis leading to a painful hip. Hip pain can manifest as groin pain and upper thigh pain. Generally arthritis pain is most severe after a prolonged period of inactivity such as first thing in the morning and at the end of the day.

Knee – The knee joint is a hinge joint composed of the end of the thigh bone (femur), the top of the shin (tibia), and the kneecap (patella). These parts all contain cartilage. The cartilage can be damaged or degraded by conditions such as arthritis or trauma leading to knee pain. Swelling in the knee joint can sometimes be seen from inflammation. Knee pain can manifest in localized pain or pain in the thigh or shin. Generally arthritis pain is most severe after a prolonged period of inactivity such as first thing in the morning and at the end of the day.

Ankle – The ankle joint is a hinge joint formed by the ends of the tibia, fibula (shin bones) and talus bone in the foot. These bones are held together by important ligaments separated by a shock absorbing layer of cartilage. The cartilage and/or tendons can be damaged from injury or arthritic conditions leading to a painful ankle. The damaged ankle joint can feel stiff and the pain typically increases with activities such as walking, running and pivoting exercises

Shoulder – The human shoulder is composed of the clavicle (collarbone), the scapula (shoulder blade), and the humerus (upper arm bone). These bones are held together by important tendons and ligaments such as the rotator cuff tendons. Cartilage lines the joint. The cartilage and/or tendons can be damaged from injury or arthritic conditions leading to a painful shoulder. Shoulder pain is typically worsened with overhead activities. The pain can be localized to the shoulder or radiate into the arm or neck.

Spine – The spine is a complex column of load-bearing vertebral bones. The spine relies on surrounding muscles, ligaments, and connective tissues for proper function. The vertebrae of the spine resemble a “block” and carry most the weight of the human body on their front, round portion, called the “vertebral body”. These vertebral bodies are separated by shock- absorbing cartilaginous discs. The discs resemble jelly donuts, with a strong, fibrous exterior and a gel interior. The rear portions of the vertebrae are connected above and below by joints called faces that guide and limit spinal movement. The cartilage in the discs and the facet joints can be damaged by conditions such as arthritis leading to pain in the neck or back.

Other Conditions:

Hand/Wrist/Elbow/Tendons/Ligaments/Muscles

Inflammation or damage to tendons or muscles such as achilles tendon, rotator cuff tendon, tennis elbow, plantar fasciitis.

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